What Are The Supporting Ideas?

What does a topic mean?

noun.

a subject of conversation or discussion: to provide a topic for discussion.

the subject or theme of a discourse or of one of its parts..

What kind of evidence can you use to support your ideas?

There are many ways to present your evidence. Often, your evidence will be included as text in the body of your paper, as a quotation, paraphrase, or summary. Sometimes you might include graphs, charts, or tables; excerpts from an interview; or photographs or illustrations with accompanying captions.

What are main ideas?

The main idea is the central, or most important, idea in a paragraph or passage. It states the purpose and sets the direction of the paragraph or passage. • The main idea may be stated or it may be implied. • When the main idea of a paragraph is stated, it is most often found in the first.

What are supporting points?

The topic is what the paragraph or essay is about, the supporting points are the most important things you have to say about your topic. You will have generated the supporting points in your pre-writing activities. The main points should be important, distinct, and relevant.

How can you support evidence?

Present evidence that contradicts your stance, and then argue against (refute) that evidence and therefore strengthen your position. Use sources against each other, as if they were experts on a panel discussing your proposition. Use quotations to support your assertion, not merely to state or restate your claim.

What are the 5 types of evidence?

15 Types of Evidence and How to Use ThemAnalogical Evidence. … Anecdotal Evidence. … Character Evidence. … Circumstantial Evidence. … Demonstrative Evidence. … Digital Evidence. … Direct Evidence. … Documentary Evidence.More items…•

What is another word for main idea?

What is another word for main idea?gistessencepivotrootsumthrustbasisbearingcentral ideacentral theme238 more rows

How do you support a claim?

Some things will make your claim more effective than it would otherwise be:Make one point at a time.Keep claims short, simple and to the point.Keep claims directly relevant to their parent.Use research, evidence and facts to support your claims.Use logic to support your claims.

What is the difference between a reason and evidence?

Evidence should answer the questions what or when. For example or one time or I remember when are all terrific lead-ins for evidence. A reason is a pattern that happens over and over again. It’s not just about the time that you caught the deep ball.

What are main and supporting ideas?

The main idea is the “key concept” being expressed. Details, major and minor, support the main idea by telling how, what, when, where, why, how much, or how many. Locating the topic, main idea, and supporting details helps you understand the point(s) the writer is attempting to express.

What is the supporting sentence?

A supporting sentence is a sentence with information that supports a main idea or claim. … You will find supporting sentences in the middle of a paragraph – after the topic sentence, and before a concluding sentence or transition.

What are the 4 types of evidence?

The four types of evidence recognized by the courts include demonstrative, real, testimonial and documentary.

What are supporting reasons?

Write an argument that uses at least two reasons to support your claim. Your argument should include all the features of a classical argument except the section on summarizing and responding to opposing views (covered in WA3/WA4/WA7). This means the paper is a multi-paragraph assignment.

How do I choose a topic to write about?

Finding a TopicPick a topic that interests you: The more interested you, as the writer, are in the topic, the easier it will be to write about. … Pick a topic that you have experience with: Having experience with a particular subject provides a foundation that can be expanded upon through the writing process.More items…

How do you support an argument?

Here are the more common ways to support your claims:Analogy. In this technique, you make your case by comparing two objects, arguing that certain observable or proven similarities mean that a similar action should also occur for both situations. … Proof by contradiction. … Citing authority. … Example and detail.